Subject Material

Pygmalion

Published: 08.06.2010, Updated: 17.07.2013
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Eliza with her nose in the air. Does Eliza remind you of anyone else?Eliza with her nose in the air. Does Eliza remind you of anyone else?  George Bernard Shaw (1856 –1950) was born in Dublin. He is famous for his plays and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1925. From an early age, Shaw identified himself as a socialist. His literary work mirrored this commitment and he bravely challenged the hypocrisies surrounding marriage, language and convention.

Pygmalion (1913) has become Shaw's most famous play, mostly through its film adaptation as My Fair Lady. Through Eliza Doolittle, a Cockney flower girl, Shaw demonstrates how speech is  linked to social classes. In the following video-clip we are introduced to Eliza Doolittle. When we first meet her, she speaks with a Cockney accent     (east end of London) or what Professor Henry Higgins calls kerbstone English. According to Higgins, her English will keep her in the gutter the rest of her life. However, he can improve her chances in life by teaching her proper English or what often is referred to as ”Queen’s English”. He makes a bet with his friend Colonel Pickering and claims that within three weeks he will pass Eliza off as a duchess at an ambassador's garden party.

Listen to Eliza in the this clip from the 1938 version of the play: Pygmalion - Eliza 


Pygmalion – Full Text  

 

Tasks and Activities

Comprehension

Pygmalion - Multiple Choice  

 

Discuss

  1. What is typical of Eliza’s language (Cockney)?
  2. The "Queen's English" should be the only proper way of speaking.
  3. Language determines one's status.
  4. Language is reflected in manners, habits and dress.
  5. Language determines what kind of jobs one will get.

Act It Out

  • Work in pairs and act out a lesson between Professor Higgins and Eliza. The lesson may well include famous quotations such as “The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plains” and “In Hampshire, Hereford and Hartford hurricanes hardly ever happen”. Use your imagination.
  • Work in groups and make a role play in which speech and choice of words are crucial. Act it out.

Further Research

Search for 'Pygmalion' and 'George Bernhard Shaw' on the Internet using sites like YouTube and see if you can find some clips from the play. Pay attention to the various accents.

 

 

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